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A Short Intro To BABY’S BREATH

Flowers have a way of conveying a message and Baby’s Breath is no exception. With significance originating during Victorian times, the use of the flower has remained a consistent part of floral design.

Baby’s Breath (Gypsophila paniculate) was introduced to the United States in the late 1800s by none other than Queen Victoria of England. Her use of the flower in gardens, floral arrangements, and her wedding florals has led to the Victorian trends we’re still drawn to today. Add Baby’s Breath to designs to convey the feelings of love, purity, and innocence.

Baby’s Breath is a group of annual and perennial flowers that contains approximately 100 varieties and is from the same family as carnations known as Caryophyllaceae. Unsurprisingly, the scientific name Gypsophila paniculate has Greek origins in its meaning which describes its growing nature. Gypsophila is derived from its natural habitat of gypsum-rich soils while paniculate refers to its tufted flowers on branching stems.

If growing Baby’s Breath strikes your fancy, there are a few things to be mindful of. While this plant grows almost anywhere, it prefers full sun if it is to grow to its fullest potential of up to 35.5 inches in height. The flowers of Baby’s Breath can be white, pink, or violet and bloom throughout spring and summer.

Hardy in USDA zones 3 through 9, be sure to plant in well-draining soils to ensure it grows to its fullest potential. Seeds should be placed approximately 9 inches apart and barely covered with soil as light aids germination. In about 10 days, germination occurs and with proper care, plants will survive and spread for years to come.

With significance originating during Victorian times, the use of the flower has remained a consistent part of floral design.

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